Tag Archive | Rethink

Diversity Week

KPMG Diversity Week

KPMG Diversity Week

This week is the KPMG Diversity week, 5 days celebrating diversity in the workplace. We have a number of diverse groups within the firm ranging from the religous, Jewish, Islamic and Christian societies, our LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual and Transgender society called “Breathe”, KNOW, the “women’s” group which focuses on issues particularly facing women in the workplace and sponsored by a senior male Partner along with groups providing specific support for parents, disabled staff, working dads and those promoting a healthy work-life balance.

Today I hijacked the lunchtime session as, being Mental Health Awareness Week here in the UK, I felt that it should be the focus of our day today.

We had a lovely time talking to several people about mental health and hopefully encouraged a few more to talk openly and honestly about mental health issues.

Richard is our Workability facilitator in Birmingham and he is on a mission to promote diversity and disability awareness in our office.

We need people like Richard to fly our flag!

Thank you.

Depression- stigma and discrimination

 Prejudice Ignorance Fear postcard

We all know about the stigma associated with mental illness and depression. We have probably all experienced it or seen it happen. The scale of discrimination against those with mental illness is shameful. The impact of stigma and discrimination upon individuals, communities and society is devastating, so why should we care and what can we do to eradicate it?

By speaking and writing openly and honestly about my experience of depression, I want to help to educate more people about depression and its symptoms and impact on all concerned.  I want to Stop The Ignorance (and) Generate Mental-illness Awareness. I want to de-mystify this illness and correct all those myths which can lead to discrimination.

Membership form

Why should we care?

According to “Stigma Shout” produced by Time To Change, stigma and discrimination;

  • Prevents people from seeking help
  • Delays treatment
  • Impairs recovery
  • Isolates people
  • Excludes people from day-to-day activities
  • stops people getting jobs

So how can you help?

Without doubt this problem is huge and beyond the best intentions of one or two individuals. What we need is for as many people suffering with mental illness to talk about their experiences and provide first hand experience of stigma and discrimination to organisations such as Depression Alliance, Rethink, MIND, Mental Health Media and Time To Change. These organisations fight every day for a fairer deal, more respect and extra support for those with mental illness. Consider being a Time To Change Champion or Rethink Activist.

We need successful people living with depression to come forward and explain how they cope. All those people who are in recovery can stand up and give hope to everyone not quite there yet.

Let us educate and communicate with the general public, family and friends so that they better understand depression and learn to see us, not the illness.

No, it’s not easy, and not everyone reading this will be able to or want to put themselves forward to assist. That’s OK too.

T ime To Change Campaign

BBC Access All Areas-Bi-Polar and Autism “hidden” disabilities

Cllr Robert Inwood speaks out

Rethink

The stigma enigma

Unfortunately, stigma still surrounds those with mental illness and depression,  further increasing the risk of patients feeling ashamed, worthless, weak, hopeless and helpless. So does it have to be like this, or are there ways that us depressives can fight back so that we educate, communicate and resonate?

My mission for 2011 is to help eradicate the stigma attached to mental illness and depression. I believe in this very personal campaign because everyone deserves a chance, and because depression can strike anybody at any time often leaving a trail of devastation in its wake. We  all need to be prepared and armed to cope with the onset of the Beast.

Do I really think that we can educate enough people about depression so that the stigma is reduced? Do I really think that admitting to mental illness will become a matter of fact in future and not a brave thing to do? Yes  I do and here are just a few of the comments I received from my friends and colleagues after my admission in May and you will understand why I am so positive that Change will happen and happen soon.

“A very brave step indeed to publicly ‘out’ yourself, but well done for doing so.  If no ones does, there will be no improvements! 

“I think depression is hugely misunderstood and I think its great that it gets a no-nonsense representative like you!” 

“I wish you every success in getting through to people.” 

“Brilliant, well done Caroline. You’re a lady with a mission and rightly so :-)” 

“Fantastic news!  Well done Caroline, what an incredibly positive thing you are doing xx”

“It’s my pleasure to support the fight against the stigma towards mental illness
It’s like Ghandi said “Be the change you want to see in the world” so with more people like you around we’ll get there.”

How do we fight this stigma and how do we educate others? I will give you some ideas next time. Until then, encouraging open and honest discussions about mental illness and depression will start the ball rolling- let me know how you get on.

Further information you may like;

Time to Change
Rethink