Job interviews-scary monsters

Goodness me! That was scary. I had a job interview today for the first time in more than 8 years.

I pride myself of my flexible and outward-looking perspective on life. I understand that at almost 50 years of age, that at some point I will need to bow out gracefully and allow the younger generation to come in and supply the dynamic and exciting solutions to the challenges that we face now. That’s progress. But, I’m just not ready.

I had an interview today. Not for a paid position, but for a voluntary post on the Regulatory Board of  the British Association of Counsellors and Psychotherapists (BACP). I had prepared, and I am passionate about helping those dealing with mental illness from both a professional and personal perspective but let’s not beat about the bush here, I was grilled relentlessly about my suitability for the role.

This was no surprise as it is just the approach I would have taken when dealing with such a serious committment and whether I do or whether I don’t get the job, I respect the decision made by the interview committee. Mental health and its management is dear to my heart and it has to be dealt with properly. BACP  takes the regulation of counsellors and therapists very seriously and whilst registration with them will be voluntary,  I can only hope that anyone who is involved in advising those with mental health will undertake the necessary training and continued professional and educational development to ensure that vulnerable people are given the best care available.

Anyone with mental health problems deserves proper treatment from qualified professionals. There is no room for amateurism in the treatment of mental illness and only those who have been trained in the various treatments available and their advantages and risks should be in this privileged position. Unless a person is trained properly, how can they possibly determine the best treatment? The best therapist?

I for one would not be so arrogant as to advise someone unless I had studied mental health and the therapies available.

Perhaps this is because I am a risk management adviser by profession.  

Or perhaps my common sense gene kicks in and tells me that I shouldn’t mess with something I know very little about, despite my personal experience.

By all means seek help. But seek professional help, from someone who is qualified to advise.

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4 thoughts on “Job interviews-scary monsters

  1. Professional help can make a huge positive difference with a counselor suited to your needs. Unfortunately, a counselor not familiar with the challenges you face can make recovery much more difficult.

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