Pir Bakran’s Shrine

After an interesting visit to the old Jewish Synagogue and Cemetery we made our way to the shrine of Pir Bakran, a Sufi saint and mystic who died in 1303 and after which this small town is named. On arrival the gates were locked, but the phone number of the guardian was posted on the inside gates. We called the number and within 5 minutes the guardian arrived on his motorbike.

The shrine is noted for the stucco work which is particularly ornate and it’s amazing to think how long ago these carvings were done. The mihrab and entrance doors are fine examples of the famous stucco and I hate to think how long it took for the craftsmen to complete them. The shrine is also famous for the surviving Kufic script which, when written in blocks as it is here, looks very much like a maze.

As Pir Bakran’s fame spread, so the building in which he preached was extended to accommodate the increasing number of followers who came to listen to him and several rooms were added. From the outside the shrine looks like it is a 4-story building but in fact it is only 2 storys high which is reminiscent of the Ali Qapu Palace in Esfahan which appears to be 7 storys high but is only 4. This is no coincidence as the architect and project manager of the Ali Qapu Palace was inspired by Pir Bakran’s shrine design and carvings 200 years later and some of the designs are reproduced in the royal Palace.

One of the rooms has a circular area carved out of the floor where apparently Pir Bakran used to sit and meditate for up to 40 days at a time eating and drinking nothing and surviving only by touching sacred stones which provided him with the sustenance he needed to see him through these lonely periods.

In an adjacent room Pir Bakran’s tomb, together with that of the shrine’s architect Mohammad Naghash rest side by side covered in green cloth. 

The guardian was extremely helpful and very knowledgeable and again, this site is well worth a visit if history, Persian culture, architecture and design are what interest you. Unless you speak Farsi however, it is advisable to travel with a Farsi speaker who is able to ring the guardian and ensure that you get the most out of your visit. You won’t be disappointed.

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2 thoughts on “Pir Bakran’s Shrine

  1. Another enthralling post. At this rate I will have to contribute to the cost of your airline ticket – it feels increasingly like I am piggy – backing on your trip! I was enthralled by your account of the visit to the Sufi shrine. I wear a ring with a hebrew engraving of the phrase from King Solomon – ‘Gam ze yavor’ in Hebrew – ‘And this too shall pass’. This phrase is also attributed to Sufi poets, but no one is quite sure which one(s). I think of it as my motto in life.

    • So many of the Middle Eastern cultures are intertwined. The whole area was so far in advance of everyone else centuries ago and I find it astonishing and fascinating as you can probably tell! Feri loves Iranian poetry so I will ask him if he knows the motto 🙂

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